Friday
Nov222013

FABULOUS MOORAGE SPOT IN JOIGNY

Where there's a will, there's a way!  We arrived in Joigny, on the Canal de Bourgogne, to discover that its pleasure port was full.  So we pulled up across the river and moored against an old stone wall.  There were several huge iron rings all along it, and we managed to secure Nooit Volmaakt using two of them.  We felt amazingly fortunate because after we were settled in, we just stepped onto the stone walkway and within a minute's walk were in the heart of this beautiful old town. 

Friday
Nov222013

SANCERRE VINEYARDS

These vineyards surround the hilltop village of Sancerre, famous for its white wine.  We moored down below, and were told that the easiest and quickest way to make it to the village top was to go directly through the vineyards and that everyone does this.  It took us about half an hour and we were well rewarded with a panoramic view, from ancient battlements, of the pastoral surrounding countryside below.  And of course, a glass or two of wonderful wine!

Friday
Nov082013

CHATEAU DE LA CLAYETTE

Imagine driving through bucolic countryside and coming across this Chateau in a tiny village!   This privately-owned chateau is surrounded by a huge koi filled moat.  Around the corner is an old mill house, incorporated into a gateway leading into the chateau, and a little shop which sells local cheese, wine and jellies. But other than that, there really isn't much information about the chateau or its owners, who clearly like to lead a private life.

Friday
Nov082013

BARGE SCROLL WORK

We haven't come across that many barges with this kind of design on the bow.  We were told by the owner of a Dutch shipyard up in Harlingen, Holland, that he could tell immediately that this meant our barge was built in Roman Catholic Holland, as the Protestants would never have put such "frippery" on their working boats.  We've painted the bow several times now, carefully tracing this scrollwork like the many people who've painted Nooit Volmaakt before us.  The star on the bow is from the days of old when the Dutch were proud to indicate that their barge was mortgage free. 

Friday
Nov082013

JACQUEMART-ANDRE MUSEUM 

 

 We'd never heard of this Paris museum before and found it almost like visiting a chateau right in the heart of Paris.  This "museum in a mansion" was built at the end of the 19th century in Haussmann’s redesigned Paris as the private residence of wealthy art collectors, Edouard André and Nélie Jacquemart.  They devoted their entire lives to collecting works of art and displaying them in their fabulous home.  Eduoard Andre was heir to a Protestant banking family - so just like today - that's where the money is!  At least in this case a large portion of it was devoted to a collection like this which folks like us are able to see today.